osaka

Solar Tea Lantern - Osaka (square)

(STL-OSQ)

kobe

Solar Tea Lantern - Kobe (square)

(STL-KSQ)

tokyo

Solar Tea Lantern - Tokyo (square)

(STL-TSQ)

nagoya

Solar Tea Lantern - Nagoya (round)

(STL-NR)

SMJLT

Solar Mini Japanese Lantern - Tokyo
(SMJL-T)

SMJLO

Solar Mini Japanese Lantern - Osaka

(SMJL-O)

SMJLKO

Solar Mini Japanese Lantern - Kobe

(SMJL-KO)

SJPLS

Solar Japanese Lantern - Saiseki
(SJPL-S)

Solar Japanese Lantern - Yojiru
(SJPL-Y)

American Colonial Lanterns (ACC-LT) (ACC-LS)

American Colonial Lanterns
(ACC-LT) (ACC-LS)

Kukei (rectangle) Yukima-gata   (JPLKK)

Kukei (rectangle)
Yukima-gata
 (JPLKK)

Mashikaku (square) Yukima-gata   (JPLM)

Mashikaku (square)
Yukima-gata
 (JPLM)

Kosai (small) Yukima-gata   (JPLK)

Kosai (small)
Yukima-gata
 (JPLK)

Saiseki (stone) Ikekomi-gata   (JPLS)

Saiseki (stone)
Ikekomi-gata
 (JPLS)

Yojiru (twist) Ikekomi-gata   (JPLY)

Yojiru (twist)
Ikekomi-gata
 (JPLY)

Japanese Lamp (JLAMP)

Japanese Lamp
(JLAMP)

Kobe (MJLKO)

Mini Japanese
Lantern - Kobe
(MJLKO)

Mini-Japanese Lantern Kyoto (MJLKY)

Mini Japanese
Lantern - Kyoto (MJLKY)

Mini-Japanese Lantern  Tokyo (MJLT)

Mini Japanese
Lantern - Tokyo (MJLT)

Mini-Japanese Lantern  Osaka (MJLO)

Mini Japanese
Lantern - Osaka (MJLO)

Mini-Japanese Lantern Nagoya (MJLN)

Mini Japanese
Lantern - Nagoya (MJLN)

Mini Japanese Lantern-Yokohama (MJLY)

Mini Japanese
Lantern-Yokohama
(MJLY)

Lanterns

osaka

 

Solar Tea Lantern - Osaka (square)

(stl-osq)

Klaus Kinast
size: w6 1/2" x d6 1/2" x h8 1/2"
weight: 10 lb (3 pieces)
(shown in Western Slate)

 

kobe

Solar Tea Lantern - Kobe (square)

(stl-ksq)

Klaus Kinast

size: w6 1/2" x d6 1/2" x h11"
weight: 10 lb (3 pieces)
(shown in Ancient Stone)

solar


Solar Tea Lantern - Tokyo (square)

(stl-tsq)

Klaus Kinast
size: w6 1/2" x d9" x h12"
weight: 10 lb (3 pieces)
(shown in York Stone)

solar

Solar Tea Lantern - Nagoya (round)

(STL-NR)

Klaus Kinast
size: w8" x d8" x h8"
weight: 10 lb (3 pieces)
(shown in York Stone)

 

smjlt

Solar Mini Japanese Lantern - Tokyo
(SMJLT)
Designed by Klaus Kinast
size: w10" x d9" x h16"
weight: 23 lb (3 pieces)

smjlo

Solar Mini Japanese Lantern - Osaka

(SMJLO)
Designed by Klaus Kinast
size: w9" x d9" x h14"
weight: 18 lb (3 pieces)

smjlko

Solar Mini Japanese Lantern - Kobe

(SMJLKO)
Designed by Klaus Kinast
size: w9" x d9" x h16"
weight: 19 lb (3 pieces)

sjpls

Solar Japanese Lantern - Saiseki
(SJPLS)
Designed by Brandon Vickerd
size: w9" x d9" x h33"
weight: 80 lb (3 pieces)

SJPLS

Solar Japanese Lantern - Yojiru
(SJPLY)
Designed by Brandon Vickerd
size: w9" x d9" x h32"
weight: 80 lb (3 pieces)


American Colonial Collection - Lanterns Tall & Short

American Colonial Collection - Lamps Tall & Short

Tall

(ACC-LT)

Designed by Klaus Kinast

15" x 15" x 43"; 150lbs (3 pieces)

Short

(ACC-LS)

Designed by Klaus Kinast

15" x 15" x 38"; 120lbs (3 pieces)

 Kukei (rectangle) Yukima-gata


Kukei (rectangle) Yukima-gata

(JPLKK)

Designed by Brandon Vickerd

10" x 8" x 22"; 80lbs (3 pieces)

JAPANESE LANTERN; YUKIMA-GATA Stone lanterns were developed in 16th century Japan as a method of lighting garden paths leading to tearooms. Traditional tea ceremonies were often held in the evening. Guests would be expected to attain a certain level of mental refinement before reaching the tearooms, aided by strolling through a peaceful inner garden. Every element of the tea ceremony was designed to discourage distraction and promote inner harmony. Various forms of lantern evolved: Yukima-gata (snow-viewing lanterns) Yukima-gata are characterized by their low posture and open legged design. They are the most common type of lantern and are often found near water. They derive their name from the way that snow delicately gathers on their roofs.

In this series: Mashikaku (square) yukima-gata Kosai (small) yukima-gata Kukei (rectangle) yukima-gata

Mashikaku (square) Yukima-gata

Mashikaku (square) Yukima-gata

(JPLM)

Designed by Brandon Vickerd

16" x 12" x 19"; 80lbs (3 pieces)

JAPANESE LANTERN; YUKIMA-GATA Stone lanterns were developed in 16th century Japan as a method of lighting garden paths leading to tearooms. Traditional tea ceremonies were often held in the evening. Guests would be expected to attain a certain level of mental refinement before reaching the tearooms, aided by strolling through a peaceful inner garden. Every element of the tea ceremony was designed to discourage distraction and promote inner harmony. Various forms of lantern evolved: Yukima-gata (snow-viewing lanterns) Yukima-gata are characterized by their low posture and open legged design. They are the most common type of lantern and are often found near water. They derive their name from the way that snow delicately gathers on their roofs.

In this series: Mashikaku (square) yukima-gata Kosai (small) yukima-gata Kukei (rectangle) yukima-gata

 Kosai (small) Yukima-gata


Kosai (small) Yukima-gata

(JPLK)

Designed by Brandon Vickerd

13" x 13" x 16"; 45lbs (3 pieces)

JAPANESE LANTERN; YUKIMA-GATA Stone lanterns were developed in 16th century Japan as a method of lighting garden paths leading to tearooms. Traditional tea ceremonies were often held in the evening. Guests would be expected to attain a certain level of mental refinement before reaching the tearooms, aided by strolling through a peaceful inner garden. Every element of the tea ceremony was designed to discourage distraction and promote inner harmony. Various forms of lantern evolved: Yukima-gata (snow-viewing lanterns) Yukima-gata are characterized by their low posture and open legged design. They are the most common type of lantern and are often found near water. They derive their name from the way that snow delicately gathers on their roofs.

In this series: Mashikaku (square) yukima-gata Kosai (small) yukima-gata Kukei (rectangle) yukima-gata

 

Saiseki (stone) Ikekomi-gata

Saiseki (stone) Ikekomi-gata

(JPLS)

Designed by Brandon Vickerd

8" x 6" x 34"; 80lbs (3 pieces)

JAPANESE LANTERN; IKEKOMI-GATA Stone lanterns were developed in 16th century Japan as a method of lighting garden paths leading to tearooms. Traditional tea ceremonies were often held in the evening. Guests would be expected to attain a certain level of mental refinement before reaching the tearooms, aided by strolling through a peaceful inner garden. Every element of the tea ceremony was designed to discourage distraction and promote inner harmony. Various forms of lantern evolved: Ikekomi-gata (buried lanterns) Ikekomi-gata lack a pedestal base and are therefore held steady by being buried in the ground. They are found throughout the tea garden, particularly close to a special hand-washing bowl, known as a tsukubai.

In this series: Yojiru (twist) ikekomi-gata Saiseki (stone) ikekomi-gata

Yojiru (twist) Ikekomi-gata

Yojiru (twist) Ikekomi-gata

(JPLY)

Designed by Brandon Vickerd

8" x 8" x 33"; 80lbs (3 pieces)

JAPANESE LANTERN; IKEKOMI-GATA Stone lanterns were developed in 16th century Japan as a method of lighting garden paths leading to tearooms. Traditional tea ceremonies were often held in the evening. Guests would be expected to attain a certain level of mental refinement before reaching the tearooms, aided by strolling through a peaceful inner garden. Every element of the tea ceremony was designed to discourage distraction and promote inner harmony. Various forms of lantern evolved: Ikekomi-gata (buried lanterns) Ikekomi-gata lack a pedestal base and are therefore held steady by being buried in the ground. They are found throughout the tea garden, particularly close to a special hand-washing bowl, known as a tsukubai.

In this series: Yojiru (twist) ikekomi-gata Saiseki (stone) ikekomi-gata

Japanese Lamp

Japanese Lamp

(JLAMP)

Designed by Klaus Kinast

14 " x 14" x 36"; 95lbs (3 pieces)

Kobe

Mini Japanese Lantern - Kobe

(MJLKO)

Designed by Klaus Kinast

8 " x 8" x 17"; 20lbs (3 pieces)

Stone lanterns were developed in 16th century Japan as a method of lighting garden paths leading to tearooms. Traditional tea ceremonies were often held in the evening. Guests would be expected to attain a certain level of mental refinement before reaching the tearooms, aided by strolling through a peaceful inner garden. Every element of the tea ceremony was designed to discourage distraction and promote inner harmony and various forms of lantern evolved. In this series: 'Tokyo' - a 'Tachi-gate,' or pedestal lantern 'Kyoto' - a 'Yukimi-gata,' or snow viewing lantern 'Tokyo' - an 'Oki-gata,' or small lantern 'Osaka' - an 'Oki-gata,' or small lantern 'Nagoya' - a 'Yukimi-gata,' or snow viewing lantern

Kyoto

Mini Japanese Lantern - Kyoto

(MJLKY)

Designed by Klaus Kinast

11.5 " x 11.5" x 17"; 30lbs (2 pieces)

Stone lanterns were developed in 16th century Japan as a method of lighting garden paths leading to tearooms. Traditional tea ceremonies were often held in the evening. Guests would be expected to attain a certain level of mental refinement before reaching the tearooms, aided by strolling through a peaceful inner garden. Every element of the tea ceremony was designed to discourage distraction and promote inner harmony and various forms of lantern evolved. In this series: 'Tokyo' - a 'Tachi-gate,' or pedestal lantern 'Kyoto' - a 'Yukimi-gata,' or snow viewing lantern 'Tokyo' - an 'Oki-gata,' or small lantern 'Osaka' - an 'Oki-gata,' or small lantern 'Nagoya' - a 'Yukimi-gata,' or snow viewing lantern

Tokyo

Mini Japanese Lantern - Tokyo

(MJLT)

Designed by Klaus Kinast

10 " x 7" x 17"; 24lbs (3 pieces)

Stone lanterns were developed in 16th century Japan as a method of lighting garden paths leading to tearooms. Traditional tea ceremonies were often held in the evening. Guests would be expected to attain a certain level of mental refinement before reaching the tearooms, aided by strolling through a peaceful inner garden. Every element of the tea ceremony was designed to discourage distraction and promote inner harmony and various forms of lantern evolved. In this series: 'Tokyo' - a 'Tachi-gate,' or pedestal lantern 'Kyoto' - a 'Yukimi-gata,' or snow viewing lantern 'Tokyo' - an 'Oki-gata,' or small lantern 'Osaka' - an 'Oki-gata,' or small lantern 'Nagoya' - a 'Yukimi-gata,' or snow viewing lantern.

Osaka

 

Mini Japanese Lantern - Osaka

(MJLO)

Designed by Klaus Kinast

8 " x 8" x 16"; 19lbs (3 pieces)

Stone lanterns were developed in 16th century Japan as a method of lighting garden paths leading to tearooms. Traditional tea ceremonies were often held in the evening. Guests would be expected to attain a certain level of mental refinement before reaching the tearooms, aided by strolling through a peaceful inner garden. Every element of the tea ceremony was designed to discourage distraction and promote inner harmony and various forms of lantern evolved. In this series: 'Tokyo' - a 'Tachi-gate,' or pedestal lantern 'Kyoto' - a 'Yukimi-gata,' or snow viewing lantern 'Tokyo' - an 'Oki-gata,' or small lantern 'Osaka' - an 'Oki-gata,' or small lantern 'Nagoya' - a 'Yukimi-gata,' or snow viewing lantern.

Nagoya

Mini Japanese Lantern - Nagoya

(MJLN)

Designed by Klaus Kinast

10 " x 10" x 12"; 20lbs (3 pieces)

Stone lanterns were developed in 16th century Japan as a method of lighting garden paths leading to tearooms. Traditional tea ceremonies were often held in the evening. Guests would be expected to attain a certain level of mental refinement before reaching the tearooms, aided by strolling through a peaceful inner garden. Every element of the tea ceremony was designed to discourage distraction and promote inner harmony and various forms of lantern evolved. In this series: 'Tokyo' - a 'Tachi-gate,' or pedestal lantern 'Kyoto' - a 'Yukimi-gata,' or snow viewing lantern 'Tokyo' - an 'Oki-gata,' or small lantern 'Osaka' - an 'Oki-gata,' or small lantern 'Nagoya' - a 'Yukimi-gata,' or snow viewing lantern.

 

Yokohama

Mini Japanese Lantern-Yokohama

(MJLY)

Designed by Klaus Kinast

9.5" x 9.5" x 14"; 20lbs. (3 Pieces)

Stone lanterns were developed in 16th century Japan as a method of lighting garden paths leading to tearooms. Traditional tea ceremonies were often held in the evening. Guests would be expected to attain a certain level of mental refinement before reaching the tearooms, aided by strolling through a peaceful inner garden. Every element of the tea ceremony was designed to discourage distraction and promote inner harmony and various forms of lantern evolved. In this series: 'Tokyo' - a 'Tachi-gate,' or pedestal lantern 'Kyoto' - a 'Yukimi-gata,' or snow viewing lantern 'Tokyo' - an 'Oki-gata,' or small lantern 'Osaka' - an 'Oki-gata,' or small lantern 'Nagoya' - a 'Yukimi-gata,' or snow viewing lantern.